Catherine Toney – 20 years -Immediate release per FIRST STEP ACT!!!

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Catherine Toney – 20 years -Immediate release per FIRST STEP ACT!!!

Congratulations to Catherine Toney and her family!!!

Catherine, her daughter Brandy, and her granddaughter Channon, went to the White House and met President Trump on February 21st, for Black History Month. He introduced Katherine as the “First female to receive an immediate release under the First Step Act.” 

                          

Name: Catherine Terracia Toney catherine-toney

DOB: 07-16-1963
Race: Black
Marital Status: Single
Age: 55
Children: Daughter- Brandy Toney (Only child)
Grandchildren: Granddaughter – Channon Toney (one)
Raised: Alabama
Tried: Mobile, AL
Where will you release: Mobile, AL
Charge: Conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute cocaine base
Sentence: 20 years
Served to date: 15 Years
Started Sentence on: April 1, 2003
Priors: 3
Prison Conduct: Good
Clemency Status: CP14 approved, submitted by Duke University attorney, Pending File # C182746
Supporters: Family and Friends
Institution: Marianna Federal Prison Camp
Accomplishments: I have successfully completed the drug treatment programs, adult continuing education classes, vocational skills courses and received my GED. I have a long list of classes I have completed.


According to Catherine: 

I was sentence to 20 years in prison in the U.S. Southern District of Alabama after pleading guilty to conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute cocaine base. My co-defendant, my older brother, was indicted along with me for 132.3 grams of cocaine base combined together with 54.7 grams attributed to me. My brother received 62 months and also received the two points he was released in 2007.

I have spent the last 13 years and seven months in Federal Prison rehabilitating myself. I am now and have been preparing myself to be a productive citizen that contribute to society. I am 53 years old and I was 39 when I came to prison and I have missed out on so much of my daughter and family lives over the past years. Before prison I look back at myself as being lazy, looking for an easy way out instead of being an adult, a mother and a hard honest worker. I take complete responsibility for all the mistakes and failures I have made in my life. Today I can honestly say that I am not that woman I was 13 years ago with time to think about my wrong doings and how I can make amends with myself, my family and society. I am very remorseful for causing my daughter and my family pain, heartache and embarrassment. My daughter was 14 years of age when I was first incarcerated and now at 28 years of age she has become a productive young woman (for which I am very proud) with an eight year old daughter herself.

I have worked very hard to rehabilitate myself.  I have missed out so much of my daughter and family lives over the past 13 years. Before prison I look back at myself as being lazy. I didn’t push myself enough when times got tough. I was looking for an easy way out instead of being an adult, a mother and a hard honest worker. In the end, I still lost everything I own, even my dignity. I take complete responsibility for all the mistakes and failures I have made in my life. Today, I can honestly say that I am not that woman I was 13 years ago. I have used this time to think about my wrong doings and how I can make amends with myself, my family and society.

Under the criteria of former Attorney General Eric Holder, low-level, non-violent drug offenders are eligible if they have been in prison for at least 10 years, have demonstrated good conduct in prison and most importantly would have probably received a substantially lower sentence if convicted of the same offense today. I was even appointed an attorney under President Obama’s Clemency Project 2014. I meet every criteria that is set for clemency under this initiative and this may be my last chance to be able to become the leader of my family and the example that I know I can be.

I am very remorseful for causing my daughter and family pain, heartache and embarrassment. My daughter was 14 years of age when I was first incarcerated and now at 28 years of age, she has become a productive young woman (of which I am very proud) with an eight year old daughter herself. My daughter works 2 jobs to support her and her daughter who has become a role model. Recently, she had to send her daughter to live with her father because of her work hours. She wasn’t able to pick her up from school and spend quality time with her. If I was home, I could help her keep her daughter, so she wouldn’t have to grow up without her mother. I would also be able to contribute financially since I have developed skills in floor maintenance, business education, and landscaping. For the first time, I would be able to meaningfully contribute to society.

My efforts and good behavior has resulted in my placement at a minimum security prison camp where there are no fences. I have been given furloughs to travel without an officer into the town of Marianna, Fl to attend doctor’s appointments.

I am committed to helping others change their lives for the better. For the last, several years I’ve prided myself of being a role model to my fellow inmates. I encourage them to better themselves through education, spiritual and vocational programming. I strive to lead by example by taking each prison task and assignment and performing it to the best of my natural God-given ability.

In conclusion, I pray to receive consideration for my petition and be blessed with a second chance at life to become a productive citizen. When I am granted clemency, I will be able to become the leader of my family and the example I know I can be.

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